A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers


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Chapter 3 deals with the use of the basic human senses for identifying hazards. Chapter 4 deals with different classes and categories of hazards.

Description

Chapter 5 deals with techniques and methodologies for identifying and evaluating hazards. Chapter 6 deals with making risk based decisions.

Stanford Libraries

Chapter 7 deals with follow-up and call to action. Chapter 8 deals with learning and continuous improvement. The Appendices provide references, case studies, hazard presentations and additional pictures. Additional Product Features Dewey Edition.

3 editions of this work

Moreover, case studies show how the concepts and techniques discussed in the book can be applied in real-world situations. Moreover, case studies show how the concepts and techniques discussed in the book can be applied in realworld situations. Show More Show Less. Any Condition Any Condition. This model would result in an overall risk rating ranging from 0 to The following is a simple example using this system. A garage owner has identified hazards in the motor vehicle repair workshop, the type of harm associated with each hazard, those exposed and the risks involved, taking into account existing controls.

Storage in locked metal cupboards, only small amounts in workshop, suitable containers, barrier creams used, face masks provided and worn, overalls without pockets provided.

Occupational safety and health - Wikipedia

Regular fire drills, fire signage, correct extinguishers provided and checked regularly, assembly points, persons in charge of evacuation and liaison with fire authority, good housekeeping. All equipment appropriately guarded, regular maintenance, staff training provided by manufacturers. Maintenance of equipment, compressor located in side room, hearing protection provided on request. Extraction equipment in welding bay, respirators, face visors and necessary personal protective equipment provided, screens around welding bays. Good housekeeping, spills dealt with immediately both in office and workshop environments; tools, devices, cables and lines put away after use.

Scoring a 0 for either likelihood or severity results in a final 0 outcome, and this may not always appear to be intuitively correct. Not all the numbers between are achievable and a gap exists between 20 and 25, which is at the high-risk end of the scale, where more discrimination may be required. Some systems dispense with the 0 scores and reverse the remaining scores in order to make 1 represent certainty and catastrophic harm and 5 represent extreme unlikelihood and minor harm.

Such a system also has the advantage that the risks can then be dealt with in priority order, ie 1, 2, 3, etc. Whether or not a number system is used to rank risks, the end result should be a system that clearly indicates the risk level determined and the action that needs to follow. According to BS now replaced by BS , the following approach can be adopted. These risks are considered acceptable.

No further action is necessary other than to ensure that the controls are maintained. No additional controls are required unless they can be implemented at very low cost in terms of time, money and effort. Actions to further reduce these risks are assigned low priority but need to kept under periodic review to ensure they do not escalate to a medium risk level. Consideration should be given as to whether the risks can be lowered to a tolerable level, and preferably to an acceptable level, but the costs of additional risk reduction measures should be taken into account.

The risk reduction measures should be implemented within a defined time period. Substantial efforts should be made to reduce the risk. Risk reduction measures should be implemented urgently within a defined time period and it might be necessary to consider suspending or restricting the activity or to apply interim risk control measures until this has been completed.

These risks are unacceptable. Substantial improvements in risk controls are necessary so that the risk is reduced to a tolerable or acceptable level.


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The work activity should be halted until risk controls are implemented that reduces the risk so that it is no longer very high. The dynamic risk assessment DRA process is the continuous process of identifying hazards, assessing risk, taking action to eliminate or reduce risk, monitoring and reviewing, in the rapidly changing circumstances when work activities involve fluid environments.

This is in situations where individual workers need to make quick assessments and manage risks as the incident develops, taking account of any new hazards and introducing control measures as necessary to allow existing or new tasks to proceed. Many of the situations where a DRA is applicable are those in which workers interact with members of the public, eg the police, ambulance workers, social workers, home helps and shop workers.


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In the main, the risks faced by such workers can be assessed and controlled with conventional risk assessments and robust management. However, when workers interact with customers or the general public, situations that have not been covered may develop and DRA will be needed. PET is a process that focuses on three elements: people, environment and task, and can be used to identify the factors and level of potential risk.

It involves the consideration of the following. People: employees should consider what they already know about the people they come into contact with, along with behavioural awareness of how individuals are acting at any moment during the interaction. They should not overlook themselves in the assessment.

They should consider:. Environment: employees should consider the environment they will be working in and use their situational awareness to continue to assess their surroundings. Task: by assessing the task they are carrying out, they can identify triggers that may increase the likelihood of aggression, and they should consider:. Tasks should be halted completely if the risk outweighs the benefits to be gained. This means that risk expectations should be communicated clearly to workers when they work in dynamic environments.

Basic OH&S Program Elements

They have to be empowered to take proactive moves to protect their own safety and their employers should support their decisions. In addition, there may be situations where it is difficult to control the actions of others or environmental conditions. There are several online risk assessment tools available. The HSE has developed interactive tools to help those working in low-risk offices and shops, including charity shops, understand what they need to do to assess and control risks in the workplace and comply with health and safety law. The HSE has also produced a printable risk assessment and policy template Word document.

This template brings together the risk assessment, health and safety policy and record of health and safety arrangements into one document. At present, tools are available for sectors including: cleaning, hairdressing, leather and tanning, live performance, private security and maritime transport which is under development. Preparation: Up to a certain degree OiRA allows companies to tailor the risk assessments to their own specificities by answering a few simple questions.

Identification: This involves looking for those things at work that have the potential to cause harm, and identifying who may be exposed to the hazard. Evaluation: This phase consists of prioritising the risks that have been identified. The prioritisation later helps to decide which measures should be implemented first.

Action plan: The tool will then help to generate an action plan and to decide how to eliminate or control risks. OiRA online interactive risk assessment tools are available at oiraproject. Hazard identification and risk assessment techniques need to be applied by designers, manufacturers, suppliers, installers and users of articles and substances as well as by employers in relation to the work activities being carried out. Often, the level and complexity of risk justifies a simple five steps approach. However, if the risks are high and complex, more sophisticated techniques may be required, the general principles of which are given below.

There are a number of risk assessment techniques, depending on the nature and complexity of the hazards and risks. The techniques range from qualitative , semi-quantitative or quantitative assessments, to more specialist methods, such as job safety analysis , hazard and operability studies , failure mode and effect analysis FEMA , fault tree analysis and event tree analysis. Specific sectors may use other techniques and advice should be sought if there is any doubt about these or how more generic tools such as FEMA should be interpreted.

Hazard and operability HAZOP studies adopt a qualitative approach to hazard identification and are often employed at the planning or design stage of a project. Although the technique is strictly a critical enquiry into the operation of a plant, it can be extended to investigate foreseeable risks related to products in the development stage.

It is important a team takes part in the HAZOP activity rather than an individual, as all foreseeable deviations from original intention are more likely to be considered.

Individuals may focus upon certain deviations at the expense of others, perhaps due to experience. The results from the exercise can be tabulated under the following headings. However, the core of the HAZOP approach involves the use of guide words, which alert users to foreseeable deviations from the intention. Typical guide words include: no, not, more, less, as well as, part of, reverse and other than. Failure mode and effect analysis is a hazard identification and risk assessment technique which explores the effects of failures or malfunctions of individual components within a system.

Occupational Hazard Identification Risk Assessment and Risk Control

At the design stage, a team considers all the possible failure modes of every component of the final product. Each component can have several failure modes, eg a thread can shear completely or the thread can become partly worn. For each failure mode, scores are ascribed often between 1 and 5 for:. A risk rating is determined for each failure mode by multiplying the three scores together and a course of remedial action suggested.

A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers
A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers
A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers
A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers
A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers
A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers
A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers A Practical Approach to Hazard Identification for Operations and Maintenance Workers

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